True Crime On This Day February 24th

Last Updated on September 21, 2022 by Ben Oakley

True Crime On This Day February 24th

February 24th

On February 24th in true crime, murder for hire, war, missing persons mystery, end of watch, new-born murder, and cold cases.

1978

Five men with mental health issues went missing in Yuba City, California. Four bodies were discovered in the Sierra. The fifth, Gary Mathias, was never found.

It would become one of the great mysteries of Marysville, California. The bodies were discovered on a dangerous mountain road, 50 miles from their homes. It became known as the American Dyatlov Pass Incident or the Yuba City Five.

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1979

The Yemenite War of 1979 was a conflict between North Yemen and South Yemen. On June 24th 1978, President Ahmad al-Ghashmi of North Yemen, was assassinated.

Although it could not be proven who had killed him, the new leaders of the countries became hostile towards each other and began small border incursions. This led to a full-blown war that started on February 24th.

Over the course of just over three weeks, the South Yemeni Army were winning a three-front invasion of North Yemen, when the Arab League and Kuwait stepped in.

A successful mediation resulted in the Kuwait Agreement of 1979, which saw Arab League forces patrol the border between North and South.

An agreement to bring peace to both countries was also signed but was never implemented. 2,833 people lost their lives in the short-lived war.

1980

In Salt Lake City, Utah, the body of 22-year-old Timothy Glashien was discovered by hikers at Millcreek Canyon.

He had been shot multiple times the day before by hitman-for-hire Stephen Wayne Anderson, who later confessed to the murder. He was also convicted of another murder in California and had used the same weapon to kill Glashien.

He was later sentenced to death and executed in January 2002. Anderson never told investigators who hired him to kill Glashien, and to this day, their identity remains a mystery.

1981

In San Francisco, California, 65-year-old Mae W. Gebhard vanished without a trace. She had last been seen by her husband in the mid-afternoon when they had argued over a phone bill, causing Gebhard to storm out of their place of residence.

When she didn’t return, her husband reported her missing just before midnight. In 1980, Gebhard had been involved in a car incident and was still in pain from her injuries.

When she stormed out, she took all her medication with her including a box of her husband’s sleeping pills.

Despite an investigation leaning towards suicide, no trace of Gebhard has ever been found. Later investigators believe she had been met with foul play. Her disappearance remains a mystery.

1982

In Sierra County, California, a power company employee fished out a suspicious looking black trash bag from the Truckee River.

When he opened it, he found the body of a newborn baby girl. She had been thrown into the river approximately one week earlier. It was suspected the newborn had been met with foul play and was thrown into the river to cover up her murder.

Despite a large investigation to track the mother, no one has ever come forward to claim responsibility for the new-born’s death. Her case remains unsolved.

1983

In Albuquerque, New Mexico, 35-year-old Police Officer Gerald Eugene Cline was shot and killed when he responded to calls involving a man with a gun at a motel.

He was the first officer to arrive on the scene and parked his vehicle close to the motel. As Cline began walking towards the building, the suspect exited his room and opened fire, hitting him in the chest and killing him instantly.

More police officers soon arrived and arrested the 29-year-old suspect. He was later sentenced to death for Cline’s murder but it was commuted to life soon after, by a governor leaving office.

The suspect died in prison in 2019, just one month before his next parole hearing.

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